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Winter Driving Safety

By treenadmin, 11/09/2017 - 09:48

Winter has started early this year with the first snowfall of the season in November in the Lower Mainland. It is predicted that the coldest periods will be in early and late December, early and late January, and mid-February, with the snowiest periods in early and late December. Winter conditions – such as freezing temperatures, rain, snow, black ice and reduced daylight hours –create additional hazards, typically for occupational drivers, whether they drive a vehicle full time, or just as part of their job. If you drive a company or personal vehicle for work, the following information will help reduce your risk of a crash during the winter driving season (October 1 to March 31) and help you prepare for an emergency.  

DRIVE FOR THE CONDITIONS

Pay full attention to your driving and the road ahead. When you are behind the wheel, driving is your only job. Allow extra time for work travel. Adjust your schedule so you aren’t rushing to get to your destination. Slow down when driving. Posted speed limits are for ideal road conditions. Reduce your speed, depending on the conditions. Make sure you are able to see and be seen in low light conditions, blowing snow or whiteouts. Visibility is critical. Limit your driving time at night. Increase the distance between your vehicle and the vehicle driving in front of you. Always accelerate and brake slowly. Use caution when approaching highway maintenance equipment. Be prepared to meet driving challenges such as limited visibility in adverse weather conditions, pedestrians or cyclists wearing dark clothing.

UNDERSTAND AND AVOID THE HAZARDS OF SEASONAL RAIN AND FOG:

Light rain mixed with residual oil can make road conditions slick. Heavy rain creates conditions ideal for hydroplaning. Fog can reduce the visibility of the road ahead to as little as the front of the vehicle. Driving in fog should be avoided whenever possible.

UNDERSTAND AND AVOID THE HAZARDS OF SNOW AND ICE:

Hard-packed snow on a road can be as slippery as ice. Snow can also be rutted and full of hard tracks and snow “gullies” that can throw your vehicle off track. Wet snow can make for slushy roads. Heavy slush can build up in the wheel wells and affect your ability to steer. Slush and spray from other vehicles can cause sudden loss of visibility. Ice forms on roads in shaded areas, on bridges and overpasses – these sections of road often freeze much sooner and stay frozen long after the sun has risen. Sections of the road that appear black and shiny have frosted over and can cause a vehicle to suddenly lose traction. Familiarize yourself with the vehicle’s controls and take a few moments to adjust side and rear-view mirrors and your seat position, especially if you don’t drive the same vehicle every day. Plan, and take, rest breaks along the way if you travel longer distances.

WHAT SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN YOUR VEHICLE PREPAREDNESS KIT?

Always have winter safety and emergency equipment in your car. A basic car kit should contain the following:

  • Food that won’t spoil, such as energy bars
  • Water—plastic bottles that won’t break if the water freezes (replace them every six months)
  • Blanket
  • Extra clothing and shoes or boots
  • First aid kit with seatbelt cutter
  • Small shovel, scraper, and snowbrush
  • Candle in a deep can and matches
  • Wind‑up flashlight
  • Whistle—in case you need to attract attention
  • Roadmaps
  • Copy of your emergency plan

ITEMS TO KEEP IN YOUR TRUNK:

  • Sand, salt or cat litter (non-clumping)
  • Antifreeze and windshield washer fluid
  • Tow Rope
  • Jumper cables
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Warning light or road flares

Print or download the Emergency Car Kit list. Cross items off the list as you put them in your car.

You can check off quite a few of these items with one of our Vehicle Emergency Preparedness Kits. Check out our website or contact our sales team for more information.

 sales@treensafety.com
604-253-4588
www.treensafety.com
Safety is your concern, It’s our commitment

References: WorksafeBC

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